In my November and December posts, I discussed the basics regarding protection of your Florida Homestead from forced sale by creditors and some of the exceptions.

A recent decision from the Second District Court of Appeal of Florida provides a good reminder of another Florida Homestead pitfall.

The Florida Constitution, Article X, Section 4 provides

When an individual files for bankruptcy protection, he/she is entitled to certain wonderful benefits.  For example, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy filing will stop (at least temporarily) a home foreclosure or car repossession and provide the individual with an opportunity to resolve financial difficulties, including time to cure arrearages.

However, with these wonderful benefits, also come

The Eleventh Circuit’s ruling in the Failla case was triumph for mortgage lenders when it affirmed the District Court’s opinion that “once the debtor decides to ‘surrender’ secured property… [w]hile the debtor need not physically deliver the property to the secured party, the debtor is precluded from taking any action which would interfere with the

Section 363 of Title 11 of the United States Code (“Bankruptcy Code”) authorizes trustees (and Chapter 11 debtors-in-possession) to use, sell, or lease property of a debtor’s bankruptcy estate outside of the ordinary course of business upon bankruptcy court approval.  Some of the key benefits for purchasers are the ability to purchase assets free and

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You have been served” – the famous phrase uttered by process servers everywhere, may never be heard by a bankruptcy defendant.

Why?

Well, Bankruptcy Rule 7004 bestows the rare privilege of nationwide service of process by FIRST CLASS U.S. MAIL of a Summons and Complaint on defendants (with a few exceptions).   In bankruptcy

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The recent decision in the Olivares case [2016 WL 6810716 (Bankr. S.D. Fla. 2016) reminds lenders of the perils of being a second mortgage holder where equity is questionable.

A lender that held a second mortgage on real property owned by the chapter 13 debtor objected to the debtor’s proposed plan on the basis that