Employment Lawyer West Palm Beach

Sometimes its hard to tell that its the holidays in Florida with no snow on the ground or chill in the air.  But the end of the year means its time for Florida employers to pay attention to the new 2019 Florida minimum wage. As of January 1, 2019, Florida’s minimum wage will rise from the current rate of $8.25 per hour to $8.46.

Under Florida Statute § 448.110 4(a) and (b), the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity must calculate Florida’s minimum wage based upon the increase, if any, in the Federal Consumer Price Index for Urban Earners and Clerical Workers in the southern region. Based upon this year’s calculation, Florida’s new minimum wage for 2019 is $8.46 per hour.

Employers of tipped employees, who meet eligibility requirements for the tip credit under the Fair Labor Standards Act, may count tips actually received as wages under the Florida minimum wage. However, the employer must pay tipped employees a direct wage. The direct wage is calculated as equal to the minimum wage, $8.46 minus the tip credit for Florida, $3.02, or a direct hourly wage of $5.44 as of January 1, 2019.

The photo in this post is of the Royal Poinciana Surfboard Christmas Tree in Palm Beach (photo by me).


Dori K. Stibolt is a partner with the law firm of Fox Rothschild LLP.  Dori defends and counsels management in labor and employment litigation matters pertaining to wage and overtime claims, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, leave/restraint, and whistle-blower claims.  You can contact Dori at 561-804-4417 or dstibolt@foxrothschild.com.

 

It is pumpkin spike latte time here in Florida which is one of the only signs of fall with our tropical weather.   Fall also is time for Florida employers to pay attention to the new 2018 Florida minimum wage.  As of January 1, 2018, Florida’s minimum wage will rise from the current rate of $8.10 per hour to $8.25 per hour.

Under Florida Statute § 448.110 4(a) and (b), the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity must calculate Florida’s minimum wage based upon the increase, if any, in the Federal Consumer Price Index for Urban Earners and Clerical Workers in the southern region.  Based upon this year’s calculation, Florida’s new minimum wage for 2018 is $8.25 per hour.

Employers of tipped employees, who meet eligibility requirements for the tip credit under the Fair Labor Standards Act, may count tips actually received as wages under the Florida minimum wage.  However, the employer must pay tipped employees a direct wage.  The direct wage is calculated as equal to the minimum wage, $8.25, minus the tip credit for Florida, $3.02, or a direct hourly wage of $5.23.

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Dori K. Stibolt is a partner with the law firm of Fox Rothschild LLP.  Dori defends and counsels management in labor and employment litigation matters pertaining to wage and overtime claims, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, leave/restraint, and whistle-blower claims.  You can contact Dori at 561-804-4417 or dstibolt@foxrothschild.com.

Please see my update, over on Fox’s In the Weeds, on the Florida Legislature’s success in passing a medical marijuana bill during the recent special session.  Now we wait on Governor Rick Scott to sign the bill, which he is expected to do.

Once Gov. Scott signs the bill into law, Florida Statute s. 381.986 (Compassionate use of low-THC and medical cannabis law) will be amended to state the following:

This section does not limit the ability of an employer to establish, continue, or enforce a drug-free workplace program or policy.  This section does not require an employer to accommodate the medical use of marijuana in any workplace or any employee working while under the influence of marijuana.  This section does not create a cause of action against an employer for wrongful discharge or discrimination. Marijuana, as defined in this section, is not reimbursable under chapter 440.

What that means is that employers will have some protections to maintain drug free workplaces and to discipline or terminate employees under the influence of medical marijuana.  But with all new laws, litigation establishing rights of employers and employees is likely.

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Dori K. Stibolt is a partner with the law firm of Fox Rothschild LLP.  Dori defends and counsels management in labor and employment litigation matters pertaining to wage and overtime claims, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, leave/restraint, and whistle-blower claims.  You can contact Dori at 561-804-4417 or dstibolt@foxrothschild.com.

Well, its a few days until kickoff at Superbowl LI.  If your office is like many, someone is collecting money for Super Bowl squares.  Most employees and employers view a friendly office pool as all in good fun and most of the time it is.

68091334 - game day football party table.
68091334 – game day football party table.

But, don’t forget, under Florida law workplace gambling is technically illegal and could form the basis for a Florida whistleblower action.

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Dori K. Stibolt is a partner with the law firm of Fox Rothschild LLP.  Dori defends and counsels management in labor and employment litigation matters pertaining to wage and overtime claims, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, leave/restraint, and whistle-blower claims.  You can contact Dori at 561-804-4417 or dstibolt@foxrothschild.com.

By many accounts, North Carolina has lost in excess of $400 million in business revenue (and a whole lot of basketball games) due to HB2.  HB2, for those who don’t know, is the controversial law that limited who could use which bathrooms and was the subject of fierce protests by many in the LGBTQ communities.  HB2 also limited state level discrimination claims (later rescinded by the legislature) and restricted the ability of local municipalities to raise the minimum wage.

Now, Charlotte City Council has repealed their non-discrimination ordinance in an effort to strike a deal with North Carolina’s state legislature to repeal HB2 and return things to the status quo.  And, the status quo may actually be better for transgender Tar Heels because they will no longer be “formally” banned from public bathrooms.  However, Charlotte’s repeal only goes into effect if the State of North Carolina repeals HB2 and that did not come to pass even after 9 hours of debate yesterday.

49137961 - blue outdoor chemical toilet in the park in winter

The bathroom battles are not over in North Carolina or nationwide (especially with a new administration waiting in the wings).   But, in general, employers and private companies are better off permitting access to the bathroom that transgender employees and customers choose to use.

I’ve written several posts on bathroom access and employment litigation regarding bathroom access.  See my posts here (OSHA guidance on bathroom access), here (EEOC settlement of litigation which included bathroom access claims), here (11th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned summary judgment in favor of employer in discrimination claim that involved restroom access), here (addressing Houston’s bathroom access ordinance) and here (litigation involving Hobby Lobby that included restroom access claims).

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Dori K. Stibolt is a partner with the law firm of Fox Rothschild LLP.  Dori defends and counsels management in labor and employment litigation matters pertaining to wage and overtime claims, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, leave/restraint, and whistle-blower claims.  You can contact Dori at 561-804-4417 or dstibolt@foxrothschild.com.

Three months ago, I posted about North Carolina’s HB2 (the transgender bathroom bill that is still garnering headlines) and that many had overlooked a big change to North Carolina’s discrimination law separate and apart from bathrooms.  As I pointed out in my prior post, lost in the protests over the bathroom issues was the fact that all North Carolina citizens had lost the private right of action to file a state level discrimination claim for race, religion, color, age, biological sex or disability.

50995163 - north carolina us state law, code, legal system and justice concept with a 3d render of a gavel on the north carolinian flag on background.

Now, North Carolina legislators have taken steps to reverse that part of HB2 and restore the private right of action for citizens to sue for discrimination related to race, religion, color, age, biological sex or disability.